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Rodeo de Santa Fe

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A snapshot of the Wild Wild West gallops into town on June 20th – 23rd with the 63rd annual Rodeo de Santa Fe!  This exciting event continues to be one of the top professional rodeos in the country.  With a variety of events spanning three days, there is certainly something for everyone.

To kick-off the events, the Rodeo de Santa Fe Parade will make it’s way through downtown on Saturday, June 16th.  The parade’s elaborate floats and family-friendly presentation is just the beginning.  The first rodeo will begin on Wednesday evening.

You may be wondering what exactly you will see at the Rodeo.

Each evening will begin with the children’s Mutton Bustin’.  In this event, children are placed upon the top of a sheep, much like a bull rider.  The sheep runs to try to remove the child.  Ribbons are given to the child who manages to ride the sheep the longest.

Following are the various competitive adult rodeo events.  These performances include roping, steer wrestling, barrel racing, saddle and bareback bronco riding and bull riding.

Last year there were over 540 contestants, including several world champion cowboys.  There will also be some light-hearted entertainment by way of rodeo clowns and a scheduled rodeo Village People.  These comedic bits are interspersed between the competitive events and provide a hilarious, family-fun environment.

On the fourth and final day of the rodeo, there is the crowning of the Rodeo Queen.  The candidates are between the age of 18 and 25, and must demonstrate knowledge of the Rodeo, horsemanship, animal welfare, and be apt at public speaking.  The Rodeo Queen receives a $1,000 scholarship and a custom-made saddle, crown, and buckle.  This is followed by the final competitive events and an evening of music, dancing, and entertainment.

Visit rodeodesantafe.org to purchase tickets and for more information.


Rodeo de Santa Fe

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A snapshot of the Wild Wild West gallops into town on June 20th – 23rd with the 63rd annual Rodeo de Santa Fe!  This exciting event continues to be one of the top professional rodeos in the country.  With a variety of events spanning three days, there is certainly something for everyone.

To kick-off the events, the Rodeo de Santa Fe Parade will make it’s way through downtown on Saturday, June 16th.  The parade’s elaborate floats and family-friendly presentation is just the beginning.  The first rodeo will begin on Wednesday evening.

You may be wondering what exactly you will see at the Rodeo.

Each evening will begin with the children’s Mutton Bustin’.  In this event, children are placed upon the top of a sheep, much like a bull rider.  The sheep runs to try to remove the child.  Ribbons are given to the child who manages to ride the sheep the longest.

Following are the various competitive adult rodeo events.  These performances include roping, steer wrestling, barrel racing, saddle and bareback bronco riding and bull riding.

Last year there were over 540 contestants, including several world champion cowboys.  There will also be some light-hearted entertainment by way of rodeo clowns and a scheduled rodeo Village People.  These comedic bits are interspersed between the competitive events and provide a hilarious, family-fun environment.

On the fourth and final day of the rodeo, there is the crowning of the Rodeo Queen.  The candidates are between the age of 18 and 25, and must demonstrate knowledge of the Rodeo, horsemanship, animal welfare, and be apt at public speaking.  The Rodeo Queen receives a $1,000 scholarship and a custom-made saddle, crown, and buckle.  This is followed by the final competitive events and an evening of music, dancing, and entertainment.

Visit rodeodesantafe.org to purchase tickets and for more information.


Hiking in the Santa Fe area

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Surrounding Santa Fe is a diversity of hikes unequaled by any other area of the state.  Access to the 12,000 foot peaks of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, the canyons and caldera of the Jemez Mountains, and the more-arid high altitude desert landscapes south of the city is all within an hour drive of Santa Fe.  Nationally designated wilderness areas, including the Santa Fe National Forest with over a million and a half acres of land, ring the city.  Five of the seven life zones can also be found within an hour of Santa Fe, providing for an abundant diversity in plant and animal species.  Spectacular geological variation adds to the allure of open space, turquoise skies, and over 300 days of sunshine.  Year- round hiking is possible because of  quick altitude changes resulting in mild microclimates.

One of my favorite hikes is the canyon trail at Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument. There’s a fascinating slot canyon that opens into spectacular tuff pinnacles whose shape resemble tents.  Becoming a series of switchbacks, the trail climbs to the ridge where 365 degree views await.  This year-round destination is just 45 minutes driving south of Santa Fe.  Hiking time is approximately 2 hours and is rated “easy” by The Sierra Club.  I like to arrive early in the morning to beat the crowd and the heat of summer.

Trailheads for the Dale Ball and Dorothy Stuart Trail Systems are barely 5 minutes driving from downtown.  These extensive urban trails through the Santa Fe foothills, are perfect for when I need a quick, easy hike, especially around sunset. With beautiful city and mountain views at an elevation of 7000 to 7500 feet, I can enjoy these trails for biking as well as hiking.

One of the most exceptional autumn hikes in the Santa Fe area is Aspen Vista Trail at 10,000 feet in the Sangre de Cristo mountains, about 20 minutes driving from downtown.  This hike ranges from easy to strenuous, taking the trail through a huge aspen forest, spectacular in fall, but beautiful anytime of year.  It is possible to take the entire trail, crossing canyon creeks cutting through towering fir and spruce forest, to Tesuque Peak, elevation 12,040 feet.

Atalaya Mountain Trail is one of the closest trails in town, about 5 minutes driving.  It’s popular for it’s proximity, easy to moderate hiking, and spectacular city and valley views.  This year-round trail is best hiked during the weekend and early in the day during summer, though much of the trail it shaded, it still gets hot.

For a true alpine experience, with open meadows filled with wildflowers, meandering mountain brooks, conifer forest, and basalt pinnacles, my favorite trail is the East Fork Trail  in the Jemez Mountains.  Frequently, rock climbers are practicing their skills climbing the basalt pinnacles at the beginning of the hike.  I like this trail for its breathtaking beauty, sound of water, and minor elevation change.  An hour driving time from Santa Fe that takes you through the spectacular Valle Grande National Preserve is all it takes to reach this exceptional experience.Cave Creek Trail, near the town of Pecos, about 45 minutes driving from Santa Fe, is a fascinating lesser-known hike in the beautiful Sangre de Cristo Mountains.  The trail runs along Panchuela Creek, water running into cracks in the limestone creating interesting caves to explore.  This is an easy hike, but the trail meets up with more strenuous hiking trails to Horsethief Meadow and Lake Johnson.

For a great strenuous hike during summer months, Lake Katherine Trail is well worth the effort.  Within 30 minutes driving,  the trail climbs through forests of spruce, fir, and aspen into The Peco Wilderness, where dramatic views and vast vistas seem to be around every corner.  Lake Katherine sits at 11,742 feet, in a high altitude bowl with Santa Fe Baldy right behind.  Caution should be taken in summer during times of thunderstorms to avoid frequent lightning strikes.

This is only the surface of the tremendous hiking opportunities around Santa Fe.  When out enjoying our sunny days and turquoise skies, it’s important to carry plenty of water, a fire source, and a cell phone.  Also be cautious of wild animals such as bears, mountain lions, and rattlesnakes.  Respect them and leave them undisturbed as you enjoy all the wondrous terrain Santa Fe has to offer.


New Mexico Arts & Crafts at The Santa Fe Artisan Market

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Paper FlowersExploring the handmade crafts and fine art produced by local Santa Fe artists is a great way to immerse yourself in local culture. At the Railyard Artisan Market, you’ll find both functional and display-ready pottery, landscape painting, fine jewelry, sculpture, wearable fiber arts, wildlife and landscape photography, hand-blown glassware, and handmade herbal body products. It’s the perfect place to buy a gift for yourself or a loved one, or to find one-of-a-kind souvenirs and mementos.
This Sunday market Artisan Market at the Market Pavilion is open every Sunday from 10am-4pm. Not only will you be able to meet with many of New Mexico’s finest artists and craftspeople, at this Sunday market, you can also enjoy live music, and have a bite at the cafe. The Railyard Artisan’s Market is pet-friendly, so bring your furry friend along.
The Railyard Artisan Market, is located at The Santa Fe Farmers Market’s home in the Railyard  at 1607 Paseo de Peralta (at S. Guadalupe St). Click here to view the map.


New Mexico Arts & Crafts at The Santa Fe Artisan Market

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Exploring the handmade crafts and fine art produced by local Santa Fe artists is a great way to immerse yourself in local culture. At the Railyard Artisan Market, you’ll find both functional and display-ready pottery, landscape painting, fine jewelry, sculpture, wearable fiber arts, wildlife and landscape photography, hand-blown glassware, and handmade herbal body products. It’s the perfect place to buy a gift for yourself or a loved one, or to find one-of-a-kind souvenirs and mementos.
This Sunday market Artisan Market at the Market Pavilion is open every Sunday from 10am-4pm. Not only will you be able to meet with many of New Mexico’s finest artists and craftspeople, at this Sunday market, you can also enjoy live music, and have a bite at the cafe. The Railyard Artisan’s Market is pet-friendly, so bring your furry friend along.
The Railyard Artisan Market, is located at The Santa Fe Farmers Market’s home in the Railyard  at 1607 Paseo de Peralta (at S. Guadalupe St). Click here to view the map.


Santa Fe Art Scene Update

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Santa Fe is the third largest art market in the country. As you can imagine, that means there are always new galleries in flux. While the Santa Fe art scene is widely known for it’s distinctive Southwestern art, there has been an increase in contemporary art galleries that are worth checking out:

David Richard Contemporary (www.davidrichardcontemporary.com) specializes in Postwar and Contemporary abstract art and features geometric, Op, Pop, color field, minimal and gestural abstraction in a variety of media. Artists who were part of important art historical movements that occurred during the 1960s through 1980s are represented, along with estates, secondary market works, and several emerging American and international contemporary artists.

Housed in the back of a custom retrofitted 1970 aluminum step-van, Axle Contemporary (http://axleart.com) is an art gallery on wheels. They host installations, performance, and thematic group exhibitions of works on paper, including photography, drawing, painting, and limited edition prints.

ViVO Contemporary (www.vivocontemporary.com) located on historic Canyon Road, represents a vibrant mix of local artists. Oil and acrylic painting, mixed media, works on paper, photography, encaustic, sculpture, and more are presented on two floors of welcoming art space. ViVO is the only gallery in Santa Fe with a room dedicated solely to book art.

In addition to the new galleries in town, there are several art events that should not be missed:

15th Annual ARTfeast Weekend (Feb. 24 – Feb. 26, 2012) Santa Fe’s most popular winter weekend, featuring fine art, food, wine, fashion, and homes benefiting ART programs for Santa Fe’s youth. (http://artfeast.com/)

ART Santa Fe (July 12- 15, 2012) will celebrate its twelfth successful fair, once again offering an all-encompassing experience that includes a high-class mix of excellent contemporary galleries from all over the globe, cutting-edge art installations, and emerging artists and dealers. The high-stakes world of the international art fair will once again provide heady, glamorous fare for serious collectors and scene-seekers alike. (http://artsantafe.com/)

SOFA WEST (August 2 – 5, 2012) is an internationally renown sculptural and functional art fair. Galleries from across the world exhibit their finest 3D artists here. The work ranges from classical sculpture to contemporary glass works, jewelry, furnishings and more. (http://www.sofaexpo.com/)

Santa Fe is also home to several museums that feature a dramatic range in artwork. As the winter comes to a close, several museums will be featuring brand new exhibitions. Take a look at what will be on display:

New Mexico Museum of Art. “It’s About Time: 14,000 Years of Art In New Mexico” (May 11, 2012 – January 2014). This exhibition traces art in the American Southwest from the earliest Clovis culture to the present. “It’s About Time” emphasizes the prime objects of artistic change as part of the centennial celebration of New Mexico statehood. (http://www.nmartmuseum.org/)

Georgia O’Keeffe Museum. “Georgia O’Keeffe and the Faraway: Nature and Image” (May 11, 2012 – May 5, 2013). This exhibition is the first to demonstrate how the beauty and elegance of O’Keeffe’s paintings were prompted by the intimacy of her ongoing experiences with the Southwest’s natural forms, especially because of the camping trips she made to remote areas. (http://www.okeeffemuseum.org/)

Museum of International Folk Art. “The Art of Gaman: Arts and Crafts from the Japanese American Internment Camps, 1942-1946” (July 8 – October 7, 2012). This exhibition showcases arts made by Japanese Americans in U.S. Internment camps during World War II. Art making became essential for simple creature comforts and emotional survival. These objects—tools, teapots, furniture, toys and games, musical instruments, pendants and pins, purses and ornamental displays—are physical manifestations of the art of gaman, a Japanese word that means to bear the seemingly unbearable with dignity and patience.


Santa Fe Art Scene Update

S

Santa Fe is the third largest art market in the country. As you can imagine, that means there are always new galleries in flux. While the Santa Fe art scene is widely known for it’s distinctive Southwestern art, there has been an increase in contemporary art galleries that are worth checking out:

David Richard Contemporary (www.davidrichardcontemporary.com) specializes in Postwar and Contemporary abstract art and features geometric, Op, Pop, color field, minimal and gestural abstraction in a variety of media. Artists who were part of important art historical movements that occurred during the 1960s through 1980s are represented, along with estates, secondary market works, and several emerging American and international contemporary artists.

Housed in the back of a custom retrofitted 1970 aluminum step-van, Axle Contemporary (http://axleart.com) is an art gallery on wheels. They host installations, performance, and thematic group exhibitions of works on paper, including photography, drawing, painting, and limited edition prints.

ViVO Contemporary (www.vivocontemporary.com) located on historic Canyon Road, represents a vibrant mix of local artists. Oil and acrylic painting, mixed media, works on paper, photography, encaustic, sculpture, and more are presented on two floors of welcoming art space. ViVO is the only gallery in Santa Fe with a room dedicated solely to book art.

In addition to the new galleries in town, there are several art events that should not be missed:

15th Annual ARTfeast Weekend (Feb. 24 – Feb. 26, 2012) Santa Fe’s most popular winter weekend, featuring fine art, food, wine, fashion, and homes benefiting ART programs for Santa Fe’s youth. (http://artfeast.com/)

ART Santa Fe (July 12- 15, 2012) will celebrate its twelfth successful fair, once again offering an all-encompassing experience that includes a high-class mix of excellent contemporary galleries from all over the globe, cutting-edge art installations, and emerging artists and dealers. The high-stakes world of the international art fair will once again provide heady, glamorous fare for serious collectors and scene-seekers alike. (http://artsantafe.com/)

SOFA WEST (August 2 – 5, 2012) is an internationally renown sculptural and functional art fair. Galleries from across the world exhibit their finest 3D artists here. The work ranges from classical sculpture to contemporary glass works, jewelry, furnishings and more. (http://www.sofaexpo.com/)

Santa Fe is also home to several museums that feature a dramatic range in artwork. As the winter comes to a close, several museums will be featuring brand new exhibitions. Take a look at what will be on display:

New Mexico Museum of Art. “It’s About Time: 14,000 Years of Art In New Mexico” (May 11, 2012 – January 2014). This exhibition traces art in the American Southwest from the earliest Clovis culture to the present. “It’s About Time” emphasizes the prime objects of artistic change as part of the centennial celebration of New Mexico statehood. (http://www.nmartmuseum.org/)

Georgia O’Keeffe Museum. “Georgia O’Keeffe and the Faraway: Nature and Image” (May 11, 2012 – May 5, 2013). This exhibition is the first to demonstrate how the beauty and elegance of O’Keeffe’s paintings were prompted by the intimacy of her ongoing experiences with the Southwest’s natural forms, especially because of the camping trips she made to remote areas. (http://www.okeeffemuseum.org/)

Museum of International Folk Art. “The Art of Gaman: Arts and Crafts from the Japanese American Internment Camps, 1942-1946” (July 8 – October 7, 2012). This exhibition showcases arts made by Japanese Americans in U.S. Internment camps during World War II. Art making became essential for simple creature comforts and emotional survival. These objects—tools, teapots, furniture, toys and games, musical instruments, pendants and pins, purses and ornamental displays—are physical manifestations of the art of gaman, a Japanese word that means to bear the seemingly unbearable with dignity and patience.


Winter in Santa Fe is Art Market Time

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Who knew that winter in Santa Fe is a great time to enjoy the various art markets that are offered.  Instead of dealing with large crowds at such summer events, come to Santa Fe in the winter and experience a slower peaceful pace at the  ”winter” art markets.

To kick things off, enjoy the Winter Indian Market Thanksgiving weekend, November 26 and 27, 2011 at the convention center.  One hundred and thirty artists selected from the Summer Indian Market will be showcasing their work.

Winter Spanish Market will take place December 3-4, 2011 also at the convention center and will feature more than 100 Hispanic artists.  One week later on December 10 and 11, forty-five Hispanic artists will display their work in the Contemporary Hispanic Market.  Artists in these two markets were selected from the summer events and both markets have free admission.

Finally, St. John’s College will again sponsor the New Mexico Spanish Colonial Artists Auction and Market on the weekend of February 10 and 11, 2012.  This event will feature 30 leading Spanish Colonial artists.

During this upcoming winter season, there will be even more art markets, giving one the opportunity to enjoy and purchase works directly from the artists.  Prices are usually more of a value that in the summer and one can get to know the artist whose work you may enjoy for many years to come.  Gallery visits are also more enjoyable as the pace in town is slower and more relaxed.


Winter in Santa Fe is Art Market Time

W

Who knew that winter in Santa Fe is a great time to enjoy the various art markets that are offered.  Instead of dealing with large crowds at such summer events, come to Santa Fe in the winter and experience a slower peaceful pace at the  “winter” art markets.

To kick things off, enjoy the Winter Indian Market Thanksgiving weekend, November 26 and 27, 2011 at the convention center.  One hundred and thirty artists selected from the Summer Indian Market will be showcasing their work.

Winter Spanish Market will take place December 3-4, 2011 also at the convention center and will feature more than 100 Hispanic artists.  One week later on December 10 and 11, forty-five Hispanic artists will display their work in the Contemporary Hispanic Market.  Artists in these two markets were selected from the summer events and both markets have free admission.

Finally, St. John’s College will again sponsor the New Mexico Spanish Colonial Artists Auction and Market on the weekend of February 10 and 11, 2012.  This event will feature 30 leading Spanish Colonial artists.

During this upcoming winter season, there will be even more art markets, giving one the opportunity to enjoy and purchase works directly from the artists.  Prices are usually more of a value that in the summer and one can get to know the artist whose work you may enjoy for many years to come.  Gallery visits are also more enjoyable as the pace in town is slower and more relaxed.