(505) 988-1631
(888) 634-8782

West to Los Alamos and through the Jemez Mountains

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Five Day-Trip Recommendations

West to Los Alamos and through the Jemez Mountains

This scenic trip winds through ruins of an ancient civilization, a high-tech research center (birthplace of the atomic bomb), traditional Pueblos, and the collapsed center of a long-dormant volcano.  Follow US 84/285 north from Santa Fe.  Then turn west on SR 502 to Los Alamos.  Connect with SR 4 to Bandelier National Monument.  Continue on NM 4 past the Valle Grande, through the Jemez Mountains and the town of Jemez Springs.  Connect with US 550 at San Ysidro to Bernalillo and then return to Santa Fe via I-25 (about 160 miles round-trip).

San Ildefonso Pueblo:  Located 23 miles north of Santa Fe, the contemporary San Ildefonso Pueblo has a flourishing art community. With an average of 20,000 visitors yearly, this is one of the most visited northern pueblos.  Famous for the matte-finish black-on-black pottery originated by potter Maria Martinez in the 1920’s, the Pueblo has several on-site craft shops and artisan’s homes open to the public for shopping. The pueblo offers spectacular views of Black Mesa, a sacred site. For pueblo information, please call 505-455 3549

Bradbury Science Museum:  This museum is operated by Los Alamos National Labs and displays scientific and historical information in three galleries – Manhattan Project history, national defense, and varied basic and applied research.  Most interesting are videos that tell the story of life at Los Alamos before and during the Manhattan Project. There are photos, documents, and objects illustrating life during these intense years when an international team of scientists raced to build an atomic bomb. Call for hours and exhibition information: 505-667-4444.

Bandelier National Monument:  The ancestors of modern Pueblo people built thriving communities about 600 years ago in the area known as Bandelier. Several thousand ancestral pueblo dwellings are found among the pink mesas and sheer-walled canyons.  The best-known archeological sites, in Frijoles Canyon near the Visitor Center, have easy access to visitors.  One can explore the area via a short, self-guided tour of the ruins or choose more in-depth hiking into the backcountry wilderness. More than 50 miles of maintained trails lead to unexcavated ruins and wildlife habitat throughout the monument.  Call the visitor center at 505-672-3861 x 517 or hear recorded information at 505-672-0343.

Tsankawi:  Tsankawi, a detached part of Bandelier National Monument, is undeveloped and unexcavated.  A 1.5 mile trail follows centuries-old paths through the area where the ancestral Pueblo people lived.  Cave dwellings, petroglyphs, and the site of Tsankawi village can be seen from the paths. Tsankawi can be found just before the entrance of Bandelier National Monument off NM 4.

Valle Grande:  This collapsed volcanic caldera is one of the largest in the world. A vast meadow approximately 3 miles in diameter and a 15-mile diameter ring of mountains are the only visible remains of a massive volcanic eruption.  The 89,000-acre Valles Caldera National Preserve in the Jemez Mountains is located 15 miles west of Los Alamos on NM 4.  The preserve is open to the public, but has managed to keep the numbers of visitors small, so you’ll feel like you have the place to yourself.  Get out and experience a profound sense of solitude that will leave you refreshed and relaxed. See wildlife, beautiful vistas, and learn about the preserve’s rich history and geology.  Schedule your visit by going to www.vallescaldera.gov.

Jemez Springs:  Nestled between stunning red rock mesa–remnants of ancient lava flows over a million years old–the village is named for its famous mineral hot springs. Fissures in the earth allow water near the surface to contact rock below that is heated by the magma underneath. The result is a steady supply of hot springs that bubble up throughout the valley. Jemez Springs is a great place to reconnect with nature and enjoy the healing mineral waters.  Artist galleries, shops and casual dining are also available.  Visit their web site at www.jemezsprings.org.

Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument:  An optional side trip on your return north on I-25 (exit 259 to NM 22 to Tribal Route 92, then Forest Service road 266) is a visit to Tent Rocks.  The area owes its remarkable geology to layers of volcanic rock and ash deposited by a volcanic explosion.  Over time, weathering and erosion of these layers has created slot canyons and tent rocks. The tent rocks themselves are cones of soft pumice and tuff beneath harder caprocks.  Hiking on maintained trails is available.  The monument is open for day use only and may be closed by order of the Cochiti Pueblo Tribal Governor.

Bandallier

Bandalier

Valle Grande

Valle Caldera

Tent Rocks

Tent Rocks


North to Taos

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Five Day-Trip Recommendations

North to Taos

This day trip will take you to the charming town of Taos, a culturally rich small town set against the Sangre de Cristo Mountains to the east and a spectacular mesa sliced by the meandering Rio Grande to the west.  For maximum sightseeing, travel to Taos on the High Road (US 84/285 to SR 503 to SR 76 to SR 518. Reach Taos in approximately 2½ hours) and return on the Low Road (NM 68 to US 84/285) that follows the Rio Grande for part of the trip.  The Low Road is about a 1½ hour drive to Santa Fe.  (Approximately 165 miles roundtrip)

Nambe Pueblo and Nambe Falls:  Nambe pueblo is an historic 700-year-old pueblo located north of Santa Fe at the foot of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains.  Beautiful Nambe Falls, 4 miles beyond the pueblo, tumbles through a rocky canyon in a spectacular display. A nearby recreational site offers an amazing setting for picnicking, hiking and camping. 505-455-2036Chimayó: This small village is located 40 miles south of Taos and 24 miles northeast of Santa Fe, about ten miles east of Española in the Sangre de Cristo mountains. It is on Hwy 76 (the “High Road”) – a scenic route through old Spanish villages. Today Chimayó is famous for the weavings of the Ortega and Trujillo families. Many shops contain their work as well as fine art and crafts from the region.  This quaint northern New Mexico town is also the home of the famous Santuario de Chimayó (a National Historic Landmark), a church built in 1814-1816 that has been the destination of countless pilgrims who attribute it with miraculous powers of healing.

Taos Pueblo: The Taos Pueblo is on the northern outskirts of the town of Taos. It consists of an amazing multi-story adobe structure built between 1000 and 1450 AD and has been inhabited for over 1,000 years.  Approximately 150 people still live within the Pueblo full time, and the people of the Pueblo continue to maintain the age-old beliefs and cultural traditions of their ancient society. Privately owned shops and galleries throughout the village support the numerous local artists. 505-758-1028

The Millicent Rogers Museum: Four miles north of Taos, visitors can enjoy an outstanding historical collection of Native American jewelry, ceramics, paintings, and weavings, as well as Hispanic textiles, metalwork, sculpture, and a wide range of contemporary Southwestern art. The original collection was amassed by Standard Oil Heiress Millicent Rogers and has been expanded to include Hispanic secular and religious arts and crafts from colonial to current times. Museum hours and information can be obtained by calling 505-758-2462.

The Taos Art Museum: The Taos Art Museum is housed in the home of Nicolai Fechin (Fechin House), who, with his family, moved to Taos in 1927. Born in Russia, Fechin is one of the most important portrait painters of the 20th Century. His paintings of Native Americans and of the New Mexico desert landscape are considered among his best works. The Museum’s permanent collection also includes many examples of Fechin’s carvings, along with over 300 works of art by more than 50 Taos artists, and features the Taos Society of Artists and Taos Moderns. 505-758-2609

San Francisco de Asis: This historic church, four miles south of Taos in Rancho de Taos, dates from 1772.  Artists such as Georgia O’Keeffe and Ansel Adams have memorialized this famous church because of its unique massive adobe and masonry architecture.  This edifice is ideally entered through the garden on the west side to fully appreciate its enormous structure and authentic adobe construction. The church is open Monday through Saturday from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., but is closed from noon to 1:00 p.m.  Please call for more information. 505-758-2754

Ohkay Owingeh (formerly the San Juan Pueblo):Returning from Taos via NM 68, one passes through this Pueblo that was established as the first Spanish capital city of the New Mexico Territory in 1598. Watch local artisans create their wares, and then purchase jewelry, pottery and other crafts at the Ohkay Owingeh Crafts Cooperative. 505-852-4400

Santuario de chimay0
Santuario de Chimayo
High Road to Taos
High Road to Taos

Taos Pueblo
Taos Pueblo


Northwest to O’Keeffe Country

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Five Day-Trip Recommendations

Northwest to O’Keeffe Country

See the landscapes of sandstone cliffs, tree-lined river beds and juniper covered foothills that inspired Georgia O’Keeffe and are reflected in her paintings. This trip takes you north from Santa Fe on US 285/84 connecting with US 84 in Española (approximately 23 miles north of Santa Fe).  For a more extensive day trip, you can continue on US 84 all the way to Chama (approximately 2 hours travel time).

mesa

Abiquiu and Ghost Ranch: See the landscapes that O’Keeffe painted and visit the places where she lived and dreamed. Guided tours of her restored adobe hacienda in the village of Abiquiu are available by advanced reservation at 505-685-4539.  Please call as far in advance as possible to book your tour.

Ghost Ranch is a large property owned by the Presbyterian Church north of Abiquiu replete with geological wonders and spectacular landscapes, many of which you’ll recognize from O’Keeffe paintings.  Abundant hiking opportunities exist throughout the area.

Abiquiu Lake: This man-made lake offers seasonal swimming, boating and some of the finest fishing in Northern New Mexico.  The reservoir, which was created by damming the Rio Chama, offers many opportunities for camping and hiking among the Pinon (Pine), Juniper, and Sage, ensconced among colorful rock formations.

Echo Amphitheater: This natural sandstone formation is a great place to camp or picnic while admiring nature’s handiwork of wind erosion on rock. Cumbres Railroad

Los Ojos:  Further up US 84 in Los Ojos, you can visit the showroom of Tierra Wools.  This is a weaving cooperative where the art of traditional Hispanic weaving still thrives.  Rio Grande style textile products are produced on-site in the showroom and are offered for sale.

Chama and Cumbres & Toltec Scenic Railroad: Travel further north on US 84 (about 2 hours from Santa Fe, or 110 miles), to reach Chama.  Nestled in the valley of the New Mexico Rocky Mountains, Chama is the southern terminus of the scenic narrow-gauge railroad that makes a spectacular trip through the alpine backcountry of New Mexico and Colorado. The rail trip north is an all-day excursion. Call 505-756-2151 to obtain departure times, tour durations and to make reservations.


Santa Fe Farmer’s Market

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Local produce at the Santa Fe Farmer's MarketSummer has officially started and the Santa Fe Farmer’s Market is in full swing!  For a town of only 75,000, Santa Fe boasts an expansive and varied market each Tuesday and Saturday morning.  Many local chefs frequent the Market in order to bring the freshest food to your dining experiences.

The Market began in the 1960s with just a handful of vendors selling just seasonally.  Since 2002, the Market is a year-round venture and features over 150 statewide vendors.   The vendors are the actual farmers and producers of the merchandise, allowing customers the chance to ask questions about what they are purchasing.  All produce and plants are 100% locally grown in New Mexico.   In addition to produce vendors, there are also several concessions and handmade crafts available.  The market requires that 80% of the materials used for crafts and processed items also be New Mexico made.

Throughout the years, the Sante Fe Farmer’s market has had various locations throughout Santa Fe.  In 2008, it moved into it’s permanent home in the Santa Fe Railyard.  The Farmer’s Market Pavilion also features events such as cooking demonstrations, farm tours, and movie nights.  Each Sunday there is an artist’s market featuring a wide range of work from local artists.  Here you will find everything from pottery and jewelry, to painting and sculpture.   Tourists and locals alike are bound to have a delightful experience at the Santa Fe Farmer’s Market each Tuesday and Saturday morning!


Santa Fe Farmer’s Market

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Summer has officially started and the Santa Fe Farmers Market is in full swing!  For a town of only 75,000, Santa Fe boasts an expansive and varied market each Tuesday and Saturday morning.  Many local chefs frequent the Market in order to bring the freshest food to your dining experiences.

The Market began in the 1960s with just a handful of vendors selling just seasonally.  Since 2002, the Market is a year-round venture and features over 150 statewide vendors.   The vendors are the actual farmers and producers of the merchandise, allowing customers the chance to ask questions about what they are purchasing.  All produce and plants are 100% locally grown in New Mexico.   In addition to produce vendors, there are also several concessions and handmade crafts available.  The market requires that 80% of the materials used for crafts and processed items also be New Mexico made.

Throughout the years, the Market has had various locations throughout Santa Fe.  In 2008, it moved into it’s permanent home in the Santa Fe Railyard.  The Farmer’s Market Pavilion also features events such as cooking demonstrations, farm tours, and movie nights.  Each Sunday there is an artist’s market featuring a wide range of work from local artists.  Here you will find everything from pottery and jewelry, to painting and sculpture.   Tourists and locals alike are bound to have a delightful experience at the Santa Fe Farmer’s Market each Tuesday and Saturday morning!


Special Treatment

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Our Santa Fe Style Special Treatment

If you’re celebrating an important event in Santa Fe, or just want to indulge a bit, we can assist you by placing items in your room before you arrive or having them delivered during your stay.  The price is our cost plus a nominal fee for procuring and readying all items requested. The following is a list of possibilities.

Wine
Champagne
Flowers
Cakes
Fruit
Snack Foods

Chocolate Covered Strawberries
Chocolates or Candy
Balloons
Cheese and Crackers
Gift Basket – Food
Gift Basket – Local items and amenities

Please call us at 1-888-634-8782 or 505-988-1631 or email us to discuss having any of these items or others placed in your room before arrival.


Restaurants

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Santa Fe Dining and Restaurants – Whether you wish to sample some of the world’s top-rated restaurants or seek out the local treasures, Santa Fe has something to satisfy every palette. Though it’s difficult to limit our recommendations, the following are some of our favorites.

 

Traditional New Mexican

The Shed
www.sfshed.com
505-982-9030
113 East Palace
Tia Sophia
505-983-9880
210 West San Francisco
Tomasitas
505-983-5721
500 South Guadalupe
La Choza
www.sfshed.com/lachoza
505-982-0909
905 Alarid
Gabriels
505-455-7000
4 Banana Lane
Guadalupe Cafe
505-982-9762422 OldSanta Fe Trail
Casa Chimayo
www.casachimayosantafe.com
505-428-0391
409 West Water

 

Contemporary American/ Southwestern

The Compound
www.compoundrestaurant.com
505-982-4353
653 Canyon Road
Geronimo
www.geronimorestaurant.com
505-982-1500
724 Canyon Road
Ristra
www.ristrarestaurant.com
505-982-8608
548 Agua Fria
Café Pasqual’s
www.pasquals.com
505-983-9340
121 Don Gaspar
Restaurant Martin
www.restaurantmartinsantafe.com
505-820-0919
526 Galisteo
La Casa Sena
www.lacasasena.com
505-988-9232
125 East Palace
Santa Café
www.santacafe.com
505-984-1788
231 Washington
Coyote Cafe
www.coyotecafe.com
505-983-1615
132 West Water
Galisteo Bistro
www.galisteobistro.com
505-982-3700
227 Galisteo

 

Spanish

El Meson
www.elmeson-santafe.com
505-983-6756
213 Washington
La Boca
505-982-3433
72 East March
El Farol
www.elfarolsf.com
505-983-9912
808 Canyon Road

 

Steak Houses

Rio Chama Steakhouse
www.riochamasteakhouse.com
505-955-0765
414 Old Santa Fe Trail
The Bull Ring
www.santafebullring.com
505-983-3328
150 Washington Avenue
Steaksmith At El Gancho
www.steaksmith.com
505-988-3333
104 Old Las Vegas Highway

 

Casual Dining

Zia Diner
www.ziadiner.com
505-988-1008
326 South Guadalupe
Plaza Restaurant
www.thefamousplazacafe.com
505-982-1664
54 Lincoln
Coyote Cantina
www.coyotecafe.com
505-983-1615
132 West Water

 

International

315 (country French)
www.315santafe.com
505-986-9190
315 Old Santa Fe Trail
Mucho Gusto (Mexican)
505-955-8402
839 Paseo de Peralta
Mu Du Noodles (Asian)
www.mudunoodles.com
505-983-1411
1494 Cerrillos Road
India Palace (Indian)
www.indiapalace.com
505-986-5859
227 Don Gaspar
Kohnami (Japanese)
www.kohnamirestaurant.com
505-984-2002
313 South Guadalupe
Il Piatto (Italian)
www.Ilpiattorestaurant.com
505-984-1091
95 West Marcy
Andiamo (Italian)
www.andiamoonline.com
505-995-9595
322 Garfield
Azur (Mediterranean)
www.azursantafe.com
505-992-2897
428 Agua Fria Street
Jambo (African/Caribbean)
www.jambocafe.net
505-473-1269
2010 Cerrillos Rd.

 

Sandwiches/Picnic Lunches

Tesuque Village Market
505-988-8848
138 Tesuque Village Road
Saveur
505-989-4200
204 Montezuma
Whole Foods
www.wholefoodsmarket.com
505-992-1700
753 Cerrillos Road

 

Vegetarian

Annapurna Chai House
www.chaishoppe.com
505-988-9688
1620 St. Michael’s Drive
Jinja Bar & Bistro
www.jinjabistro.com
505-982-4321
510 N Guadalupe St.
Back Street Bistro; Bistro
505-982-3500
513 Camino De Los Marquez

Performance Arts

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The small city of Santa Fe is large in its cultural offerings.  To complement the great visual art scene, there are many performance arts groups that fill the year with everything from grand opera at a beautiful outdoor venue to small musical events at many local restaurants.  There are offerings by talented dance, theater, instrumental and choral groups.    The downtown Lensic Performing Arts within a short walk of the inn is home to many of these groups and also provides a rich schedule of local talent, guest artists and touring entertainment.

Santa Fe Pro Musica

www.santafepromusica.com

505-988-4640

800-960-6680

Lensic Performing arts Center

www.lensic.com

505-988-1234

Santa Fe Desert Chorale

www.desertchorale.org

505-988-2282

800-244-4011

Chamber Music Festival

www.sfcmf.org

505-982-1890

888-221-9836

Santa Fe Opera

www.santafeopera.org

505-986-5900

800-280-4654

Santa Fe Film Festival

www.santafefilmfestival.com

505-988-7417

Juan Siddi FlamencoTheatre

juansiddiflamenco.com/

505-988-1234

 

Concordia Santa Fe Wind Ensemble

concordiasantafe.org/

505-913-7211

Aspen Santa Fe Ballet

aspensantafeballet.com

505-983-5591

 

Santa Fe Women’s Ensemble

www.sfwe.org

505-954-4922


Art Galleries

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Santa Fe has been called the biggest little art city in the world. Along with the adobe architecture and the clear blue skies with its intense light, art has defined Santa Fe for many decades. This area has attracted noted painters, photographers and sculptors since the late 1800’s.

Today, there are over two hundred galleries filled with art of every genre. In addition to the expected Native American pottery, jewelry, kachinas and weavings, Southwestern landscapes, vintage Western photographs, Spanish colonial religious art, one can find a significant selection of contemporary art, international fine crafts, glass and ceramic art, sculpture in various media and fine works of foreign artists.

You will find art galleries throughout the historic center of Santa Fe in the Plaza area, Railyard district, Baca street, and of course, Canyon Road. Even if you are not necessarily looking for something to fill that blank wall, a stroll up Canyon Road is a pleasant experience just to view the centuries-old architecture, outdoor sculptures and magnificent gardens.

 

Traditional Art

Meyer Gallery
www.meyergalleries.com
505-983-1434
225 Canyon Road
Gerald Peters
www.gpgallery.com
505-954-5700
1011 Paseo de Peralta
Nedra Matteucci
www.nedramatteuccifineart.com
505-983-2731
1075 Paseo de Peralta
Canyon Road Fine Art
www.canyonroadfineart.com
505-988-9511
621 Canyon Road
McLarry Gallery
www.mclarryfineart.com
877-983-2123
225 Canyon Road
Manitou Galleries
www.manitougalleries.com
800-283-0440
123 West Palace
Joe Wade Fine Arts
www.joewadefineart.com
505-988-2727
102 East Water
   

Sculpture

Shidoni
www.shidoni.com
505-988-8001
1508 Bishops Lodge Road
Nedra Matteucci
www.matteucci.com
505-982-4631
1075 Paseo de Peralta
Meyer Gallery
www.meyergalleries.com
505-983-1434
225 Canyon Road
Patricia Carlisle Fine Art Inc.
www.carlislefa.com
800-820-0596
554 Canyon Road
   

Photography

Andrew Smith Gallery
www.andrewsmithgallery.com
505-984-1234
203 West San Francisco
Eclectic Image Gallery
www.eclecticimage.com
866-989-7025
233 Canyon Road
Monroe Gallery of Photography
www.monroegallery.com
505-992-0800
112 Don Gaspar

Western/Southwestern Art

Altermann Galleries
www.altermann.com
505-983-1590
225 Canyon Road
Joe Wade Fine Arts
www.joewadefineart.com
505-988-2727
102 East Water
Zaplin-Lampert Gallery
www.zaplinlampert.com
505-982-1600
651 Canyon Road

Contemporary

LewAllen Contemperary
www.lewallencontemporary.com
505-988-8997
129 West Palace
Gaugy Gallery
www.gaugygallery.com
505-984-2800
418 Canyon Road
Turner Carroll Gallery
www.turnercarrollgallery.com
505-986-9800
725 Canyon Road
Linda Durham Contemporary
www.lindadurham.com
505-466-6600
1101 Paseo de Peralta
Hunter Kirkland Contemporary

hunterkirklandcontemperary.com
505-984-2111
200 Canyon Road

Karan Ruhlen Gallery
karanruhlen.com

505-820-0807
225 Canyon Road

Native American

Blue Rain Gallery
www.blueraingallery.com
505-954-9902
130 Lincoln
Medicine Man Gallery
www.medicinemangallery.com
505-820-7451
Canyon Road
Andrea Fisher Fine Pottery
www.andreafisherpottery.com
505-986-1234
100 West San Francisco
Case Trading Post/Wheelwright
www.casetradingpost.com

800-607-4636
725 Camino Lejo
Morning Star Gallery
www.morningstargallery.com
505-982-8187
513 Canyon Road
Sherwood’s Spirit of America
www.sherwoodsspirit.com
505-988-1776
1005 Paseo de Peralta
Niman Fine Art
www.namingha.com
505-988-5091
125 Lincoln
Robert Nichols
www.robertnicholsgallery.com
505-982-2145
419 Canyon Road
 

Textiles/Fiber Art

Packards on the Plaza
800-648-7358
61 Old Santa Fe Trail
Centinela Traditional Arts
www.chimayoweavers.com
505-351-2180
HCR 64, Chimayo
Tai Gallery
www.textilearts.com
505-984-1387
1601 Paseo de Peralta
Medicine Man Gallery
www.medicinemangallery.com
505-820-7451
Canyon Road
   

Folk Art

Tad Tribal Art
www.tadtribalart.com
505-983-4149
401 West San Francisco
Minkay Andean Art
www.minkay.com
505-820-2210
60 East San Francisco
Folk Arts of Poland
www.folkartsofpoland.com

505-984-9882
118 Don Gaspar
Pachamama
505-983-4020
223 Canyon Road
   

Art Glass

Glory Hole Glass Works
www.guadalupeglass.com
505-820-1050
202 Canyon Road
Purple Sage
www.purplesagesantafe.com
866-865-1234
110 Don Gaspar
Arlene Siegel Gallery, Ltd.
505-986-5822
102 East Water
Tesuque Glassworks
www.tesuqueglass.com
505-988-2165
1 Teseque Glass Lane
   

Spas and Fitness

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One of the more recent Santa Fe experiences that visitors and locals alike seek out is the opportunity to enjoy one of our many spas.  We have spas rich with atmosphere and exotic treatments including the Japanese-style Ten Thousand Waves, Indonesian Absolute Nirvana, and Asian and Native American influenced spas at several local hotels.  For a more basic but no less relaxing massage, try Body or the Downtown Day Spa.

If you desire a more active experience, we have numerous fitness opportunities available.   Yoga is very popular in Santa Fe and we have several studios to select from depending on the variety and skill level you are seeking.  Studios include Body of Santa Fe, Yoga Source, Yoga Moves, Yoga Santa Fe, and the Santa Fe Community Yoga Center.

Locations where you can get an energetic work out on a walk-in basis include Studio Nia, Salsa Suave (salsa classes), Moving People Dance Theatre (modern dance and more),  and two municipal fitness facilities – Fort Marcy Complex and the Genoveva Chavez Community Center (multiple fitness classes from spinning to step aerobics).  We have prepared a detailed listing of spas and fitness facilities with locations and contact information.